Hondanews Online Newsroom http://hondanews.com en-US dev@wieck.com (Wieck Media) Copyright 2014 40 Tue, 21 Oct 2014 04:09:48 -0700 Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R/CBR300R ABS - Features and Benefits <p>Great for beginners and experienced riders alike, the new CBR300R packs a 300-class engine that delivers a 17-percent boost in peak power compared to the CBR250R. Thanks to a full sport fairing, new dual headlights and new exhaust system, the CBR300R has the look of a serious sport bike. With more power, nimble handling, an affordable price and low operating cost, the CBR300R—also available with optional ABS—makes every ride a fun one.</p> <p>Features and Benefits</p> <p>- Engine displaces 286cc for added power throughout the rev range. </p> <p>- A new crankshaft and connecting rod create a longer engine stroke (up to 63mm from 55mm compared to the CBR250R) to add 37cc of displacement.</p> <p>- Remapped PGM-FI fuel injection produces crisp throttle response throughout the rev range.</p> <p>- High-quality full-coverage fairing with dual headlights evokes the styling of Honda's flagship CBR1000RR supersport bike.</p> <p>- New CBR500R-inspired exhaust system features larger internal volume for increased performance, enhanced appearance and a throaty exhaust note.</p> <p>- New seat and side covers provide an easier reach to the ground.</p> <p>- Shorter stalks on mirrors give a new, sleeker look.</p> <p>- Affordable pricing: $4399 for the standard model, $4899 for ABS version.</p> <p>- Transferable one-year, unlimited-mileage limited warranty; extended coverage available with a Honda Protection Plan. </p> <p>Honda Genuine Accessories†<br> Carbon-Fiber-Style Drive Chain Casing, Chrome Bar Ends, Carbon-Fiber-Style Lower Fairing, Color-Matched Seat Cowl, Rear Seat Cowl (Black), Carbon-Fiber-Style Front Fender, Rear Seat Bag, Carbon-Fiber Tank Pad, Cycle Cover</p> <p>Available Accessory Seat is more than 1 inch lower than the standard seat for an easier reach to the ground.</p> <p>† WARRANTY: Because we're so confident in the quality of each of our Honda Genuine Accessories, we're pleased to offer one of the best warranties in the industry. One-year warranty begins on the day accessories are purchased by the customer. </p> <p>Final accessory list TBD and subject to change without notice. </p> Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 10:32:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/releases/dcb6d749-9b77-4950-abb8-920c5965a022 http://hondanews.com/releases/dcb6d749-9b77-4950-abb8-920c5965a022 2015 Honda CBR300R/CBR300R ABS - Features and Benefits <p>Great for beginners and experienced riders alike, the new CBR300R packs a 300-class engine that delivers a 17-percent boost in peak power compared to the CBR250R. Thanks to a full sport fairing, new dual headlights and new exhaust system, the CBR300R has the look of a serious sport bike. With more power, nimble handling, an affordable price and low operating cost, the CBR300R—also available with optional ABS—makes every ride a fun one.</p> <p>Features and Benefits</p> <p>- Engine displaces 286cc for added power throughout the rev range. </p> <p>- A new crankshaft and connecting rod create a longer engine stroke (up to 63mm from 55mm compared to the CBR250R) to add 37cc of displacement.</p> <p>- Remapped PGM-FI fuel injection produces crisp throttle response throughout the rev range.</p> <p>- High-quality full-coverage fairing with dual headlights evokes the styling of Honda's flagship CBR1000RR supersport bike.</p> <p>- New CBR500R-inspired exhaust system features larger internal volume for increased performance, enhanced appearance and a throaty exhaust note.</p> <p>- New seat and side covers provide an easier reach to the ground.</p> <p>- Shorter stalks on mirrors give a new, sleeker look.</p> <p>- Affordable pricing: $4399 for the standard model, $4899 for ABS version.</p> <p>- Transferable one-year, unlimited-mileage limited warranty; extended coverage available with a Honda Protection Plan. </p> <p>Honda Genuine Accessories†<br> Carbon-Fiber-Style Drive Chain Casing, Chrome Bar Ends, Carbon-Fiber-Style Lower Fairing, Color-Matched Seat Cowl, Rear Seat Cowl (Black), Carbon-Fiber-Style Front Fender, Rear Seat Bag, Carbon-Fiber Tank Pad, Cycle Cover</p> <p>Available Accessory Seat is more than 1 inch lower than the standard seat for an easier reach to the ground.</p> <p>† WARRANTY: Because we're so confident in the quality of each of our Honda Genuine Accessories, we're pleased to offer one of the best warranties in the industry. One-year warranty begins on the day accessories are purchased by the customer. </p> <p>Final accessory list TBD and subject to change without notice. </p> Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R/CBR300R ABS - Specifications <table width="100%" border="1" cellspacing="2" cellpadding="2"> <tr> <td valign="top">Model:</td> <td valign="top">CBR300R / CBR300R ABS</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Engine Type:</td> <td valign="top">286cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder four-stroke</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Bore and Stroke:</td> <td valign="top">76.0mm x 63.0mm</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Compression ratio:</td> <td valign="top">10.7:1</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Valve Train:</td> <td valign="top">DOHC; four valves per cylinder</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Induction:</td> <td valign="top">PGM-FI, 38mm throttle body</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Ignition:</td> <td valign="top">Computer-controlled digital transistor with electronic advance</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Transmission:</td> <td valign="top">Six-speed</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Final Drive:</td> <td valign="top">#520 O-ring-sealed chain</td> </tr> <tr> <td rowspan="2" valign="top">Suspension</td> <td valign="top"><p>Front: 37mm fork; 4.65 inches travel</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><p>Rear: Pro-Link single shock with five-position spring preload adjustability; 4.07 inches travel</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td rowspan="2" valign="top">Brakes</td> <td valign="top"><p>Front: Twin-piston caliper with single 296mm disc</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><p>Rear: Single-caliper 220mm disc<br> Optional ABS (CBR300R ABS)</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td rowspan="2" valign="top">Tires</td> <td valign="top"><p>Front: 110/70-17 radial<br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Rear: 140/70-17 radial</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Wheelbase:</td> <td valign="top">54.3 inches</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Rake (Caster angle):</td> <td valign="top">25° 30’</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Trail:</td> <td valign="top">98mm (3.9 inches)</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Seat Height:</td> <td valign="top">30.7 inches</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Fuel Capacity:</td> <td valign="top">3.4 gallons</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Estimated Fuel Economy**:</td> <td valign="top">71 MPG</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Colors:</td> <td valign="top">Black, Red, Pearl White/Red/Blue, Matte Black Metallic/Yellow</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Curb Weight*:</td> <td valign="top">357 pounds (CBR300R) / 364 pounds (CBR300R ABS)</td> </tr> </table> <p>*Includes all standard equipment, required fluids and full tank of fuel—ready to ride.</p> <p>**Miles per gallon values are calculated estimates of fuel consumed during laboratory exhaust emissions tests specified by the EPA, not during on-road riding. Use for comparison purposes only. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you ride and maintain your vehicle, weather, road conditions, tire pressure, cargo and accessories, rider and passenger weight, and other factors.</p> <p>Meets current EPA standards.</p> <p>Models sold in California meet current CARB standards and may differ slightly due to emissions equipment.</p> <p>©2014 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. • All Rights Reserved • Specifications subject to change</p> Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 10:24:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/releases/4df14049-5efb-427f-81e1-fe2b2d9436a9 http://hondanews.com/releases/4df14049-5efb-427f-81e1-fe2b2d9436a9 2015 Honda CBR300R/CBR300R ABS - Specifications <table width="100%" border="1" cellspacing="2" cellpadding="2"> <tr> <td valign="top">Model:</td> <td valign="top">CBR300R / CBR300R ABS</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Engine Type:</td> <td valign="top">286cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder four-stroke</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Bore and Stroke:</td> <td valign="top">76.0mm x 63.0mm</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Compression ratio:</td> <td valign="top">10.7:1</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Valve Train:</td> <td valign="top">DOHC; four valves per cylinder</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Induction:</td> <td valign="top">PGM-FI, 38mm throttle body</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Ignition:</td> <td valign="top">Computer-controlled digital transistor with electronic advance</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Transmission:</td> <td valign="top">Six-speed</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Final Drive:</td> <td valign="top">#520 O-ring-sealed chain</td> </tr> <tr> <td rowspan="2" valign="top">Suspension</td> <td valign="top"><p>Front: 37mm fork; 4.65 inches travel</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><p>Rear: Pro-Link single shock with five-position spring preload adjustability; 4.07 inches travel</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td rowspan="2" valign="top">Brakes</td> <td valign="top"><p>Front: Twin-piston caliper with single 296mm disc</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><p>Rear: Single-caliper 220mm disc<br> Optional ABS (CBR300R ABS)</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td rowspan="2" valign="top">Tires</td> <td valign="top"><p>Front: 110/70-17 radial<br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Rear: 140/70-17 radial</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Wheelbase:</td> <td valign="top">54.3 inches</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Rake (Caster angle):</td> <td valign="top">25° 30’</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Trail:</td> <td valign="top">98mm (3.9 inches)</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Seat Height:</td> <td valign="top">30.7 inches</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Fuel Capacity:</td> <td valign="top">3.4 gallons</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Estimated Fuel Economy**:</td> <td valign="top">71 MPG</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Colors:</td> <td valign="top">Black, Red, Pearl White/Red/Blue, Matte Black Metallic/Yellow</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Curb Weight*:</td> <td valign="top">357 pounds (CBR300R) / 364 pounds (CBR300R ABS)</td> </tr> </table> <p>*Includes all standard equipment, required fluids and full tank of fuel—ready to ride.</p> <p>**Miles per gallon values are calculated estimates of fuel consumed during laboratory exhaust emissions tests specified by the EPA, not during on-road riding. Use for comparison purposes only. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you ride and maintain your vehicle, weather, road conditions, tire pressure, cargo and accessories, rider and passenger weight, and other factors.</p> <p>Meets current EPA standards.</p> <p>Models sold in California meet current CARB standards and may differ slightly due to emissions equipment.</p> <p>©2014 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. • All Rights Reserved • Specifications subject to change</p> Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R: Best of Both Worlds <ul> <li>2015 CBR300R: Best of both worlds</li> <li>Story Concepts: Editorial narratives: assets, interviews and tools</li> <li>Engineering Spotlight: Designing friendly performance</li> <li>Building Character: Expert advice for choosing a beginner bike</li> </ul> <p>With Honda's 2015 CBR300R, learning to ride can be not only enjoyable, but also cool, as the model simultaneously offers functionality and sport-bike looks. Now armed with a larger power plant, the little CBR still enables instant gratification by being both accessible and fun to ride. Greater than the sum of its parts, it possesses a mix of power and handling that works for a broad range of applications and conditions. As a result, the bike lets its owner look like a veteran starting with the first ride, and it still has the performance capability that leaves room to grow. Versatile, affordable and reliable, the CBR300R is great for commuting, trips around town, weekend outings with friends and everything in between.</p> <p><strong>Editorial Narratives & Assets</strong></p> <p><strong>Improving On a Fan Favorite</strong><br> <em>Honda's littlest sport bike gets a bigger engine, and more</em></p> <p>There's good reason that the new CBR300R has been so hotly anticipated, but the 2015 bike's improvements go well beyond a simple increase in displacement. Honda's engineers looked for opportunities to refine and improve the popular model, and the result is a cohesive package that's even easier and more fun to ride.</p> <ul> <li><strong>ENGINE:</strong> To achieve a final engine displacement of 286cc (37cc more than its predecessor), the CBR300R had its piston stroke increased from 55mm to 63mm, boosting power throughout the rev range. Peak horsepower is now 17% higher than that of the 250, and torque has increased as well.</li> <li><strong>EFI:</strong> Revised mapping is used in the PGM-FI fuel-injection system, achieving crisp, predictable throttle response and optimizing fuel efficiency.</li> <li><strong>EXHAUST:</strong> The new exhaust system (inspired by the CBR500R) looks great and performs even better, thanks in part to its larger internal volume.</li> <li><strong>ABS:</strong> The CBR300R ABS now has a two-channel brake system, with separate sensors and valves for each wheel.</li> <li><strong>ASPIRATIONAL STYLING:</strong> Just because you're new to motorcycle riding doesn't mean you have to look that way. The CBR300R took design and style cues from Honda's larger CBR and VFR bikes. The front fairing now houses dual headlights, replacing the single unit of the previous year model. In addition, the shapes of the rear cowls and fuel tank have been updated.</li> <li><strong>SEATING AREA:</strong> The seat and side covers are both narrower for 2015, resulting in a slimmer cross section, enabling the rider's feet to fall naturally and directly toward the ground when the bike is stopped.</li> <li><strong>MAINTENANCE:</strong> The CBR300R isn't just easy to ride; it also simplifies maintenance, thanks to improved access to the valves, spark plug, oil filter and rear brake reservoir. The fuel tank and side covers can also be removed more easily.</li> </ul> <p>*****************</p> <p><strong>Choose Your Flavor, Season to Taste</strong><br> <em>The naked CB300F expands Honda's flyweight sport-oriented lineup; for both models, options and accessories abound</em></p> <p>Everyone likes options, and customers of small-displacement motorcycles are no different, whether they're beginners or longtime fans of the genre. For 2015, Honda's new 300cc single-cylinder road platform is offered not just in the full-fairing, sport-bike form of the CBR300R (let's call it "spicy"), but also in a new "raw" version: the stripped-down CB300F, for consumers who prefer a streetfighter look. <br>             The CB300F's aggressive naked styling and slightly taller, flat handlebar enable a more upright riding position that's perfect for both weekend fun and confronting the urban jungle. A single headlight and streetfighter styling evocative of Honda's CB500F and CB1000R give the CB300F plenty of attitude, while shedding the fairing makes the CB300F 9 lbs. lighter than even the CBR300R, 348 lbs. curb weight compared to 357. The F version shares the low 30.7-inch seat height and narrow profile of the R edition, making it nimble and fun to ride. The CB300F starts at $3,999, $400 less than the CBR300R's $4,399 price. The faired bike is also available in an Antilock Braking System version; the CBR300R ABS is $4,899.<br>             The CBR300R and CB300F are clearly fantastic values, and with the leftover change in their pockets, riders can continue to personalize their rides with Honda Genuine Accessories. For shorter riders, Honda offers a seat for both 300 models that is over one inch lower than the stock 30.7 inches. The following additional options provide even more refinement for the CBR300R and CB300F: carbon-fiber-style drive-chain casing, chrome bar-ends, carbon-fiber-style lower fairing, color-matched seat cowl, rear seat cowl (black), carbon-fiber-style front fender, rear seat bag, carbon-fiber tank pad, cycle cover.</p> <p>*****************</p> <p><strong>Friendly, Frisky and Single</strong><br> <em>Honda's littlest CBR is the ultimate in versatility</em></p> <p>From the 2011 CBR250R to the 2015 CBR300R, Honda's littlest faired sport bike has a well-established reputation as the ideal motorcycle for beginning riders, but it's hardly a one-trick pony. In developing countries like Thailand, where it is assembled, the petite CBR is actually considerably larger than the sub-150cc bikes that teem over the roadways, and it serves as a canvas that owners often personalize through modifications as they strive to stand out from the crowd. Meanwhile, India even has a police version, complete with special lighting, a siren and a P.A. system.<br>             Here in North America, the bike has been adopted for competition use, an application where its commuter-bike power plant has proven quite durable. The model's light weight and affordable price have made it a popular choice for imitating Moto3 heroes Alex Marquez and Efren Vazquez (whose NSF250RW GP machines demonstrate the full potential of lightweight four-stroke singles). In the U.S., racing clubs like WERA, AFM, CCS, CMRA and NCRC have included the CBR250R in existing classes, while the Canadian Superbike Championship established a dedicated CBR250R National Series in 2012 (when it replaced the CBR125R Challenge). The class was intended to serve as a rung on the racing ladder, giving young or relatively novice racers experience that they can apply as they advance to larger-displacement divisions. It has proven to be extremely effective in that regard, with several past champions from the little CBR classes going on to win races in the bigger-bike categories.<br>             "It was a good bike to start on and learn some racecraft," says Stacey Nesbitt, a past Canadian CBR125R and CBR250R champion. "The bikes were all the same, so it was up to the rider to make the difference, and I got used to racing in a group. It taught me not to be intimidated with other people around me, and once I knew all the basics, it was very easy to learn how to ride a race bike." In fact, after spending a transition year aboard an RS 250 two-stroke, she has already won an Amateur 600 national this season, with a CBR600RR. </p> <p><em>Quotes are free to use for publication, and expert sources may be made available for interviews.</em></p> <p>********************************************************************************************<br> <strong>Engineering Spotlight</strong></p> <p><strong>Designing Friendly Performance</strong><br> <em>How Honda found the right balance of approachability and sportiness for the CBR300R and CB300F</em></p> <p>Building great motorcycles for new riders is familiar terrain for Honda, whose lightweight early models established the company's reputation for building economical, reliable bikes. The CBR300R and CB300F build upon that legacy with technology and features—including the class's lowest weight and seat height—that make them a great option for new riders. Here's a look at what technically makes these models as easy to live with as they are to ride. </p> <ul> <li><strong>The Power of One: </strong>The power characteristic of a single-cylinder engine is perfect for beginners, as there's no need to hold high revs just to prevent the bike from stalling. This finely tuned 286cc double-overhead-cam engine offers good torque and is smooth off the bottom and into the midrange—ideal for riders who are still learning to get rolling from a standing start. The low-revving engine also enables long service intervals, making the CBR300R and CB300F inexpensive to operate.<strong></strong></li> <li><strong>Injection Inspection: </strong>Electronic<strong> </strong>Fuel Injection makes these bikes easy to live with no matter where they're ridden. New riders will welcome the limited maintenance intrinsic to the induction system, and everyone can appreciate its frugal gas requirements. (The CBR300R and CB300F's tested fuel economy was an estimated 70 mpg*.)</li> <li><strong>Mission Control: </strong>Because beginners need to focus on acquiring new skills, they may have less available bandwidth, so it's important that a novice-focused bike react smoothly to rider input. On these two confidence-inspiring models, the throttle, clutch and brakes all boast easy, progressive operation (even for relatively small hands), and they offer good modulation with plenty of feedback. Taking this trend a step further is the CBR300R ABS, whose Antilock Braking System increases rider confidence in limited-traction situations.</li> <li><strong>Light, Low & Narrow: </strong>The CBR300R is 22 lbs. lighter than its nearest competitor, and its weight is focused low in the chassis—excellent for new riders who may be intimidated by the tippy feel of a heavier bike with a higher center of gravity. That trend is extended by the 30.7-inch seat height—lowest in its class, with an available Honda Genuine Accessory seat being more than an inch lower than that. In addition, the seat has been narrowed down, along with the side covers, making for a slim midsection that doesn't bow the rider's legs, enabling the feet to touch the ground more easily. All of this means the Honda's nimble handling inspires confidence in challenging conditions such as riding in heavy traffic.</li> <li><strong>Take a Position:</strong> While the CBR300R's styling reflects the influence of the supersport CBR600RR and CBR1000RR, its seating position gives the rider a less-aggressive, more upright stance that is preferable for learning to ride. Taking that one step further is the CB300F, whose taller handlebar puts even less weight on the rider's wrists.</li> </ul> <p>* <em>Miles per gallon values are calculated estimates of fuel consumed during laboratory exhaust emissions tests specified by the EPA, not during on road riding. Use for comparison purposes only. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you ride and maintain your vehicle, weather, road conditions, tire pressure, cargo and accessories, rider and passenger</em></p> <p>********************************************************************************************</p> <p><strong>Building Character</strong></p> <p><strong>Expert Advice for Choosing a Beginner Bike</strong><br> <em>We asked MSF instructors to weigh in on what to look for in a first bike. Not surprisingly, they may as well be describing the CBR300R and CB300F</em></p> <p>When approached correctly, few activities can compare to the exhilaration of learning to ride a motorcycle. That said, the bike one chooses for the job can greatly effect the level of enjoyment experienced and, most importantly, the degree of success that's achieved. It's easy for veteran riders to forget the details of that process, but the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's RiderCoaches work with new riders every day, making them the ultimate authorities on what characteristics make a motorcycle appropriate for new riders.</p> <p><em>"Being comfortable is very important, so you can focus on picking up new skills. It's good to have a seat that's not too firm, because if you're new to motorcycles, your body isn't used to what it feels like. A bike should have enough weight that you get the sense of a real motorcycle, but not be so heavy that you have trouble balancing. Being able to sit flat-footed really aids in keeping you secure."</em><br> Brian Albert—Honda Rider Education Center: Colton, CA</p> <p><em>"The first thing I'd recommend is a small engine size—between 250 and 300cc—so there's enough power to be fun and exciting, but not so much that it's overwhelming. That way, small mistakes with the throttle remain small and aren't exaggerated by the power. I also recommend a motorcycle that's low-cost and low-maintenance, and that can be dropped without sustaining significant damage."</em><br> Joy Lofton—Honda Rider Education Center: Alpharetta, GA</p> <p><em>"A clutch that engages a little early makes a bike more user-friendly, as does throttle response that's smooth and linear. A tight turning radius makes learning easier, and for a first motorcycle, freeway capability is nice since a lot of people will use it for commuting."</em><br> Joel Scudder—Honda Rider Education Center: Colton, CA</p> <p><em>"The transmission should be forgiving, and the shift lever should have enough length for a rider to fit most of the foot underneath. Fuel injection and the subsequent elimination of the petcock is a significant asset for new riders, as it removes one issue with training—failing to turn the fuel on, resulting in the motorcycle running out of gas."</em><br> Charles Hoying— Honda Rider Education Center: Troy, OH</p> <p><em>"The engine should have enough torque to get you rolling without stalling. It's good if the first couple of gears—which you use a lot while learning—aren't too low, so the bike doesn't feel jumpy."</em><br> Eddy Locke—Honda Rider Education Center: Colton, CA</p> <p><em>For more information on MSF RiderCourses, visit <a href="http://www.msf-usa.org" target="_blank">www.msf-usa.org</a>.</em></p> <p> </p> Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:55:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/releases/512c2c4d-a39b-4509-9b76-0d6e1e06304e http://hondanews.com/releases/512c2c4d-a39b-4509-9b76-0d6e1e06304e 2015 Honda CBR300R: Best of Both Worlds <ul> <li>2015 CBR300R: Best of both worlds</li> <li>Story Concepts: Editorial narratives: assets, interviews and tools</li> <li>Engineering Spotlight: Designing friendly performance</li> <li>Building Character: Expert advice for choosing a beginner bike</li> </ul> <p>With Honda's 2015 CBR300R, learning to ride can be not only enjoyable, but also cool, as the model simultaneously offers functionality and sport-bike looks. Now armed with a larger power plant, the little CBR still enables instant gratification by being both accessible and fun to ride. Greater than the sum of its parts, it possesses a mix of power and handling that works for a broad range of applications and conditions. As a result, the bike lets its owner look like a veteran starting with the first ride, and it still has the performance capability that leaves room to grow. Versatile, affordable and reliable, the CBR300R is great for commuting, trips around town, weekend outings with friends and everything in between.</p> <p><strong>Editorial Narratives & Assets</strong></p> <p><strong>Improving On a Fan Favorite</strong><br> <em>Honda's littlest sport bike gets a bigger engine, and more</em></p> <p>There's good reason that the new CBR300R has been so hotly anticipated, but the 2015 bike's improvements go well beyond a simple increase in displacement. Honda's engineers looked for opportunities to refine and improve the popular model, and the result is a cohesive package that's even easier and more fun to ride.</p> <ul> <li><strong>ENGINE:</strong> To achieve a final engine displacement of 286cc (37cc more than its predecessor), the CBR300R had its piston stroke increased from 55mm to 63mm, boosting power throughout the rev range. Peak horsepower is now 17% higher than that of the 250, and torque has increased as well.</li> <li><strong>EFI:</strong> Revised mapping is used in the PGM-FI fuel-injection system, achieving crisp, predictable throttle response and optimizing fuel efficiency.</li> <li><strong>EXHAUST:</strong> The new exhaust system (inspired by the CBR500R) looks great and performs even better, thanks in part to its larger internal volume.</li> <li><strong>ABS:</strong> The CBR300R ABS now has a two-channel brake system, with separate sensors and valves for each wheel.</li> <li><strong>ASPIRATIONAL STYLING:</strong> Just because you're new to motorcycle riding doesn't mean you have to look that way. The CBR300R took design and style cues from Honda's larger CBR and VFR bikes. The front fairing now houses dual headlights, replacing the single unit of the previous year model. In addition, the shapes of the rear cowls and fuel tank have been updated.</li> <li><strong>SEATING AREA:</strong> The seat and side covers are both narrower for 2015, resulting in a slimmer cross section, enabling the rider's feet to fall naturally and directly toward the ground when the bike is stopped.</li> <li><strong>MAINTENANCE:</strong> The CBR300R isn't just easy to ride; it also simplifies maintenance, thanks to improved access to the valves, spark plug, oil filter and rear brake reservoir. The fuel tank and side covers can also be removed more easily.</li> </ul> <p>*****************</p> <p><strong>Choose Your Flavor, Season to Taste</strong><br> <em>The naked CB300F expands Honda's flyweight sport-oriented lineup; for both models, options and accessories abound</em></p> <p>Everyone likes options, and customers of small-displacement motorcycles are no different, whether they're beginners or longtime fans of the genre. For 2015, Honda's new 300cc single-cylinder road platform is offered not just in the full-fairing, sport-bike form of the CBR300R (let's call it "spicy"), but also in a new "raw" version: the stripped-down CB300F, for consumers who prefer a streetfighter look. <br>             The CB300F's aggressive naked styling and slightly taller, flat handlebar enable a more upright riding position that's perfect for both weekend fun and confronting the urban jungle. A single headlight and streetfighter styling evocative of Honda's CB500F and CB1000R give the CB300F plenty of attitude, while shedding the fairing makes the CB300F 9 lbs. lighter than even the CBR300R, 348 lbs. curb weight compared to 357. The F version shares the low 30.7-inch seat height and narrow profile of the R edition, making it nimble and fun to ride. The CB300F starts at $3,999, $400 less than the CBR300R's $4,399 price. The faired bike is also available in an Antilock Braking System version; the CBR300R ABS is $4,899.<br>             The CBR300R and CB300F are clearly fantastic values, and with the leftover change in their pockets, riders can continue to personalize their rides with Honda Genuine Accessories. For shorter riders, Honda offers a seat for both 300 models that is over one inch lower than the stock 30.7 inches. The following additional options provide even more refinement for the CBR300R and CB300F: carbon-fiber-style drive-chain casing, chrome bar-ends, carbon-fiber-style lower fairing, color-matched seat cowl, rear seat cowl (black), carbon-fiber-style front fender, rear seat bag, carbon-fiber tank pad, cycle cover.</p> <p>*****************</p> <p><strong>Friendly, Frisky and Single</strong><br> <em>Honda's littlest CBR is the ultimate in versatility</em></p> <p>From the 2011 CBR250R to the 2015 CBR300R, Honda's littlest faired sport bike has a well-established reputation as the ideal motorcycle for beginning riders, but it's hardly a one-trick pony. In developing countries like Thailand, where it is assembled, the petite CBR is actually considerably larger than the sub-150cc bikes that teem over the roadways, and it serves as a canvas that owners often personalize through modifications as they strive to stand out from the crowd. Meanwhile, India even has a police version, complete with special lighting, a siren and a P.A. system.<br>             Here in North America, the bike has been adopted for competition use, an application where its commuter-bike power plant has proven quite durable. The model's light weight and affordable price have made it a popular choice for imitating Moto3 heroes Alex Marquez and Efren Vazquez (whose NSF250RW GP machines demonstrate the full potential of lightweight four-stroke singles). In the U.S., racing clubs like WERA, AFM, CCS, CMRA and NCRC have included the CBR250R in existing classes, while the Canadian Superbike Championship established a dedicated CBR250R National Series in 2012 (when it replaced the CBR125R Challenge). The class was intended to serve as a rung on the racing ladder, giving young or relatively novice racers experience that they can apply as they advance to larger-displacement divisions. It has proven to be extremely effective in that regard, with several past champions from the little CBR classes going on to win races in the bigger-bike categories.<br>             "It was a good bike to start on and learn some racecraft," says Stacey Nesbitt, a past Canadian CBR125R and CBR250R champion. "The bikes were all the same, so it was up to the rider to make the difference, and I got used to racing in a group. It taught me not to be intimidated with other people around me, and once I knew all the basics, it was very easy to learn how to ride a race bike." In fact, after spending a transition year aboard an RS 250 two-stroke, she has already won an Amateur 600 national this season, with a CBR600RR. </p> <p><em>Quotes are free to use for publication, and expert sources may be made available for interviews.</em></p> <p>********************************************************************************************<br> <strong>Engineering Spotlight</strong></p> <p><strong>Designing Friendly Performance</strong><br> <em>How Honda found the right balance of approachability and sportiness for the CBR300R and CB300F</em></p> <p>Building great motorcycles for new riders is familiar terrain for Honda, whose lightweight early models established the company's reputation for building economical, reliable bikes. The CBR300R and CB300F build upon that legacy with technology and features—including the class's lowest weight and seat height—that make them a great option for new riders. Here's a look at what technically makes these models as easy to live with as they are to ride. </p> <ul> <li><strong>The Power of One: </strong>The power characteristic of a single-cylinder engine is perfect for beginners, as there's no need to hold high revs just to prevent the bike from stalling. This finely tuned 286cc double-overhead-cam engine offers good torque and is smooth off the bottom and into the midrange—ideal for riders who are still learning to get rolling from a standing start. The low-revving engine also enables long service intervals, making the CBR300R and CB300F inexpensive to operate.<strong></strong></li> <li><strong>Injection Inspection: </strong>Electronic<strong> </strong>Fuel Injection makes these bikes easy to live with no matter where they're ridden. New riders will welcome the limited maintenance intrinsic to the induction system, and everyone can appreciate its frugal gas requirements. (The CBR300R and CB300F's tested fuel economy was an estimated 70 mpg*.)</li> <li><strong>Mission Control: </strong>Because beginners need to focus on acquiring new skills, they may have less available bandwidth, so it's important that a novice-focused bike react smoothly to rider input. On these two confidence-inspiring models, the throttle, clutch and brakes all boast easy, progressive operation (even for relatively small hands), and they offer good modulation with plenty of feedback. Taking this trend a step further is the CBR300R ABS, whose Antilock Braking System increases rider confidence in limited-traction situations.</li> <li><strong>Light, Low & Narrow: </strong>The CBR300R is 22 lbs. lighter than its nearest competitor, and its weight is focused low in the chassis—excellent for new riders who may be intimidated by the tippy feel of a heavier bike with a higher center of gravity. That trend is extended by the 30.7-inch seat height—lowest in its class, with an available Honda Genuine Accessory seat being more than an inch lower than that. In addition, the seat has been narrowed down, along with the side covers, making for a slim midsection that doesn't bow the rider's legs, enabling the feet to touch the ground more easily. All of this means the Honda's nimble handling inspires confidence in challenging conditions such as riding in heavy traffic.</li> <li><strong>Take a Position:</strong> While the CBR300R's styling reflects the influence of the supersport CBR600RR and CBR1000RR, its seating position gives the rider a less-aggressive, more upright stance that is preferable for learning to ride. Taking that one step further is the CB300F, whose taller handlebar puts even less weight on the rider's wrists.</li> </ul> <p>* <em>Miles per gallon values are calculated estimates of fuel consumed during laboratory exhaust emissions tests specified by the EPA, not during on road riding. Use for comparison purposes only. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you ride and maintain your vehicle, weather, road conditions, tire pressure, cargo and accessories, rider and passenger</em></p> <p>********************************************************************************************</p> <p><strong>Building Character</strong></p> <p><strong>Expert Advice for Choosing a Beginner Bike</strong><br> <em>We asked MSF instructors to weigh in on what to look for in a first bike. Not surprisingly, they may as well be describing the CBR300R and CB300F</em></p> <p>When approached correctly, few activities can compare to the exhilaration of learning to ride a motorcycle. That said, the bike one chooses for the job can greatly effect the level of enjoyment experienced and, most importantly, the degree of success that's achieved. It's easy for veteran riders to forget the details of that process, but the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's RiderCoaches work with new riders every day, making them the ultimate authorities on what characteristics make a motorcycle appropriate for new riders.</p> <p><em>"Being comfortable is very important, so you can focus on picking up new skills. It's good to have a seat that's not too firm, because if you're new to motorcycles, your body isn't used to what it feels like. A bike should have enough weight that you get the sense of a real motorcycle, but not be so heavy that you have trouble balancing. Being able to sit flat-footed really aids in keeping you secure."</em><br> Brian Albert—Honda Rider Education Center: Colton, CA</p> <p><em>"The first thing I'd recommend is a small engine size—between 250 and 300cc—so there's enough power to be fun and exciting, but not so much that it's overwhelming. That way, small mistakes with the throttle remain small and aren't exaggerated by the power. I also recommend a motorcycle that's low-cost and low-maintenance, and that can be dropped without sustaining significant damage."</em><br> Joy Lofton—Honda Rider Education Center: Alpharetta, GA</p> <p><em>"A clutch that engages a little early makes a bike more user-friendly, as does throttle response that's smooth and linear. A tight turning radius makes learning easier, and for a first motorcycle, freeway capability is nice since a lot of people will use it for commuting."</em><br> Joel Scudder—Honda Rider Education Center: Colton, CA</p> <p><em>"The transmission should be forgiving, and the shift lever should have enough length for a rider to fit most of the foot underneath. Fuel injection and the subsequent elimination of the petcock is a significant asset for new riders, as it removes one issue with training—failing to turn the fuel on, resulting in the motorcycle running out of gas."</em><br> Charles Hoying— Honda Rider Education Center: Troy, OH</p> <p><em>"The engine should have enough torque to get you rolling without stalling. It's good if the first couple of gears—which you use a lot while learning—aren't too low, so the bike doesn't feel jumpy."</em><br> Eddy Locke—Honda Rider Education Center: Colton, CA</p> <p><em>For more information on MSF RiderCourses, visit <a href="http://www.msf-usa.org" target="_blank">www.msf-usa.org</a>.</em></p> <p> </p> Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R/CB300F Tech Talk Video 2015 Honda CBR300R/CB300F Tech Talk Video Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:55:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/videos/2e795a5a-e231-40ce-a33b-f5ae5b1a194c http://hondanews.com/videos/2e795a5a-e231-40ce-a33b-f5ae5b1a194c 2015 Honda CBR300R/CB300F Tech Talk Video 2015 Honda CBR300R/CB300F Tech Talk Video Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/0cc1/477c/0cc1477c-b1b8-4e38-83a9-77857c6edc7d-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:55:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-6 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-6 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/0cc1/477c/0cc1477c-b1b8-4e38-83a9-77857c6edc7d-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/6e80/a470/6e80a470-d4fc-40ca-b316-91c0b9ed8824-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:54:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-7 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-7 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/6e80/a470/6e80a470-d4fc-40ca-b316-91c0b9ed8824-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/e544/f7e5/e544f7e5-615c-48df-838f-786f4986f9b4-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:53:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-4 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-4 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/e544/f7e5/e544f7e5-615c-48df-838f-786f4986f9b4-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/82eb/c392/82ebc392-9fdf-4126-b294-c28131a6694b-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:52:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-8 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-8 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/82eb/c392/82ebc392-9fdf-4126-b294-c28131a6694b-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/09fc/8186/09fc8186-abd7-4b2a-adc8-f6d9aa080c0d-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:50:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-5 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-cbr300r-5 2015 Honda CBR300R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/09fc/8186/09fc8186-abd7-4b2a-adc8-f6d9aa080c0d-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CBR300R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF250R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/f296/3f49/f2963f49-c3cd-48ea-a600-1b630b8f9f23-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF250R Motorcycles Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:13:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf250r-18 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf250r-18 2015 Honda CRF250R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/f296/3f49/f2963f49-c3cd-48ea-a600-1b630b8f9f23-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF250R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF250R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/5fa8/393f/5fa8393f-411b-4bad-b7f9-0bb45a688e93-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF250R Motorcycles Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:13:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf250r-19 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf250r-19 2015 Honda CRF250R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/5fa8/393f/5fa8393f-411b-4bad-b7f9-0bb45a688e93-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF250R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF250R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/6229/c902/6229c902-f786-413f-8c5b-20bc404127cf-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF250R Motorcycles Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:13:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf250r-17 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf250r-17 2015 Honda CRF250R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/6229/c902/6229c902-f786-413f-8c5b-20bc404127cf-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF250R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/5fac/8376/5fac8376-f94e-49b3-8180-253ddde8bb1e-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:04:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-11 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-11 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/5fac/8376/5fac8376-f94e-49b3-8180-253ddde8bb1e-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/7f4f/882e/7f4f882e-b8b8-47bf-bb9e-e3953f21d526-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:04:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-12 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-12 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/7f4f/882e/7f4f882e-b8b8-47bf-bb9e-e3953f21d526-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/3c6f/c41d/3c6fc41d-be60-4541-bda5-173d14994e2e-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:04:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-9 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-9 2015 Honda CRF450R <img 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src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/270d/38d0/270d38d0-85ff-4e8f-ad4b-c9b540e99d1b-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/889b/86eb/889b86eb-5b6c-410d-80fa-8b649a4c9ac5-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles Thu, 18 Sep 2014 09:20:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-3 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-3 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/889b/86eb/889b86eb-5b6c-410d-80fa-8b649a4c9ac5-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/3571/0bce/35710bce-e0fb-485e-8c7e-45adfb022409-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:18:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/3571/0bce/35710bce-e0fb-485e-8c7e-45adfb022409-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF250/450R Tech Talk Video 2015 Honda CRF250/450R Tech Talk Video. Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:42:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/videos/7400ed50-4a57-445b-a293-2e7f2f3f6b73 http://hondanews.com/videos/7400ed50-4a57-445b-a293-2e7f2f3f6b73 2015 Honda CRF250/450R Tech Talk Video 2015 Honda CRF250/450R Tech Talk Video. Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/4914/747f/4914747f-82b2-4277-9373-ad1f2a21d234-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:26:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-6 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-6 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/4914/747f/4914747f-82b2-4277-9373-ad1f2a21d234-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/afb3/c53b/afb3c53b-77aa-40bb-8299-1d0cd830356c-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:26:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-8 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-8 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/afb3/c53b/afb3c53b-77aa-40bb-8299-1d0cd830356c-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/a17c/d823/a17cd823-0aed-4245-ae1f-91b6086a92aa-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:26:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-7 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-7 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/a17c/d823/a17cd823-0aed-4245-ae1f-91b6086a92aa-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/2350/e269/2350e269-586d-418e-aac8-446c659f00ec-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:26:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-5 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf450r-5 2015 Honda CRF450R <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/2350/e269/2350e269-586d-418e-aac8-446c659f00ec-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF450R Motorcycles: 2015 CRF450R Specifications <p>The new CRF450R features innovations forged by competition at the highest levels. An innovative Engine Mode Select button—an industry first for motocross machines—allows the rider to easily select one of three different EFI/ignition maps. A new fork with both high-/low-speed compression and rebound damping adjustment, larger front brake, new cylinder head, exhaust system, and revised settings for the Dual-Timing PGM-FI fuel injection elevate the CRF450R's performance to a whole new level. </p> <p>New for 2015</p> <p>- New cylinder head for more top-end power and added overrev features right-side exhaust port to accommodate new exhaust system. </p> <p>- New exhaust system uses larger-diameter pipe and exhaust outlet to aid top-end power. </p> <p>- Overall exhaust system length is much shorter and closer to the bike's center of mass for more agile handling.  </p> <p>- Revised ignition map settings and new settings for the Dual-Timing PGM-FI fuel injection help increase power. </p> <p>- Peak power hits earlier in the rev range and carries longer than before. </p> <p>- New piston is even stronger thanks to a new heat-treatment process.</p> <p>- New Engine Mode Select button—an industry first among motocross machines—allows the rider to easily select one of three different EFI/ignition maps to match each track/riding conditions.</p> <p>- HRC® accessory tuning tool can be used to program custom maps actuated by the Engine Mode Select button. </p> <p>- New ACG flywheel incorporates more mass for smooth power delivery and enhanced low-end response, and makes it less prone to stalling or flame out.</p> <p>- Transmission gears are stronger for added durability.</p> <p>- New throttle return spring gives a lighter pull.</p> <p>- New clutch cable design gives a lighter pull at the lever.</p> <p>- New KYB Pneumatic Spring Fork (PSF) now offers five ways to adjust performance: high-speed and low-speed adjusters for both rebound and compression damping settings, plus air-spring adjustability.</p> <p>- New fork damper cartridge and other changes in fork construction yield a weight savings of more than 7 ounces.</p> <p>- Rear shock adjuster for rebound damping settings is now located for more convenient access.</p> <p>- New front/rear wave-style rotors with a larger 260mm front brake disc add to overall braking performance.</p> <p>- New-generation Dunlop Geomax MX52 motocross tires front and rear offer improved traction in a wide variety of terrain.</p> <p>- Front brake guide and radiator grill now feature a black finish</p> <p>- New fork covers.</p> <p>- All-new CRF® graphic.</p> <p>Honda Genuine Accessories<br> PGM-FI Tuning Kit, Workstand</p> <p>2015 SPECIFICATIONS</p> <p>Model: CRF450R</p> <p>Engine Type: 449cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder four-stroke</p> <p>Bore and Stroke: 96.0mm x 62.1mm</p> <p>Compression ratio: 12.5:1</p> <p>Valve Train: Unicam, four-valve; 36mm intake, titanium; 31mm exhaust, steel</p> <p>Induction: Dual-Timing PGM-FI, 46mm throttle body</p> <p>Ignition: Full transistor with electronic advance</p> <p>Transmission: Close-ratio five-speed</p> <p>Final Drive: #520 chain; 13T/48T </p> <p>Suspension    <br> Front: 48mm inverted KYB PSF (Pneumatic Spring Fork) with air-adjustable spring rate, and rebound and compression-damping adjustability; 12.2 inches travel.<br> Rear: Pro-Link® KYB single shock with adjustable spring preload, rebound damping adjustability, and compression damping adjustment separated into low-speed and high-speed; 12.4 inches travel</p> <p>Brakes<br> Front: Single 260mm wave-style disc with twin-piston caliper<br> Rear: Single 240mm wave-style disc</p> <p>Tires   <br> Front: Dunlop MX52 80/100-21<br> Rear: Dunlop MX52 120/80-19</p> <p>Wheelbase: 58.7 inches</p> <p>Rake (Caster Angle): 27° 04'</p> <p>Trail: 116mm (4.6 inches)</p> <p>Seat Height: 37.5 inches</p> <p>Ground Clearance: 13.0 inches</p> <p>Fuel Capacity: 1.7 gallons</p> <p>Color: Red</p> <p>Curb Weight*: 243.0 pounds</p> <p>*Includes all standard equipment, required fluids and full tank of fuel—ready to ride.</p> <p>Consult owner's manual for optional parts.</p> <p>©2014 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. • All Rights Reserved • Specifications subject to change</p> Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:17:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/releases/7fd565f0-71c3-4b0f-ac88-36aaf972a1eb http://hondanews.com/releases/7fd565f0-71c3-4b0f-ac88-36aaf972a1eb 2015 CRF450R Specifications <p>The new CRF450R features innovations forged by competition at the highest levels. An innovative Engine Mode Select button—an industry first for motocross machines—allows the rider to easily select one of three different EFI/ignition maps. A new fork with both high-/low-speed compression and rebound damping adjustment, larger front brake, new cylinder head, exhaust system, and revised settings for the Dual-Timing PGM-FI fuel injection elevate the CRF450R's performance to a whole new level. </p> <p>New for 2015</p> <p>- New cylinder head for more top-end power and added overrev features right-side exhaust port to accommodate new exhaust system. </p> <p>- New exhaust system uses larger-diameter pipe and exhaust outlet to aid top-end power. </p> <p>- Overall exhaust system length is much shorter and closer to the bike's center of mass for more agile handling.  </p> <p>- Revised ignition map settings and new settings for the Dual-Timing PGM-FI fuel injection help increase power. </p> <p>- Peak power hits earlier in the rev range and carries longer than before. </p> <p>- New piston is even stronger thanks to a new heat-treatment process.</p> <p>- New Engine Mode Select button—an industry first among motocross machines—allows the rider to easily select one of three different EFI/ignition maps to match each track/riding conditions.</p> <p>- HRC® accessory tuning tool can be used to program custom maps actuated by the Engine Mode Select button. </p> <p>- New ACG flywheel incorporates more mass for smooth power delivery and enhanced low-end response, and makes it less prone to stalling or flame out.</p> <p>- Transmission gears are stronger for added durability.</p> <p>- New throttle return spring gives a lighter pull.</p> <p>- New clutch cable design gives a lighter pull at the lever.</p> <p>- New KYB Pneumatic Spring Fork (PSF) now offers five ways to adjust performance: high-speed and low-speed adjusters for both rebound and compression damping settings, plus air-spring adjustability.</p> <p>- New fork damper cartridge and other changes in fork construction yield a weight savings of more than 7 ounces.</p> <p>- Rear shock adjuster for rebound damping settings is now located for more convenient access.</p> <p>- New front/rear wave-style rotors with a larger 260mm front brake disc add to overall braking performance.</p> <p>- New-generation Dunlop Geomax MX52 motocross tires front and rear offer improved traction in a wide variety of terrain.</p> <p>- Front brake guide and radiator grill now feature a black finish</p> <p>- New fork covers.</p> <p>- All-new CRF® graphic.</p> <p>Honda Genuine Accessories<br> PGM-FI Tuning Kit, Workstand</p> <p>2015 SPECIFICATIONS</p> <p>Model: CRF450R</p> <p>Engine Type: 449cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder four-stroke</p> <p>Bore and Stroke: 96.0mm x 62.1mm</p> <p>Compression ratio: 12.5:1</p> <p>Valve Train: Unicam, four-valve; 36mm intake, titanium; 31mm exhaust, steel</p> <p>Induction: Dual-Timing PGM-FI, 46mm throttle body</p> <p>Ignition: Full transistor with electronic advance</p> <p>Transmission: Close-ratio five-speed</p> <p>Final Drive: #520 chain; 13T/48T </p> <p>Suspension    <br> Front: 48mm inverted KYB PSF (Pneumatic Spring Fork) with air-adjustable spring rate, and rebound and compression-damping adjustability; 12.2 inches travel.<br> Rear: Pro-Link® KYB single shock with adjustable spring preload, rebound damping adjustability, and compression damping adjustment separated into low-speed and high-speed; 12.4 inches travel</p> <p>Brakes<br> Front: Single 260mm wave-style disc with twin-piston caliper<br> Rear: Single 240mm wave-style disc</p> <p>Tires   <br> Front: Dunlop MX52 80/100-21<br> Rear: Dunlop MX52 120/80-19</p> <p>Wheelbase: 58.7 inches</p> <p>Rake (Caster Angle): 27° 04'</p> <p>Trail: 116mm (4.6 inches)</p> <p>Seat Height: 37.5 inches</p> <p>Ground Clearance: 13.0 inches</p> <p>Fuel Capacity: 1.7 gallons</p> <p>Color: Red</p> <p>Curb Weight*: 243.0 pounds</p> <p>*Includes all standard equipment, required fluids and full tank of fuel—ready to ride.</p> <p>Consult owner's manual for optional parts.</p> <p>©2014 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. • All Rights Reserved • Specifications subject to change</p> Motorcycles: 2015 CRF450R Press Kit PDF <p> Whether you’re a pro like factory Honda racers Trey Canard and Cole Seely or an amateur vet rider at your local track, one thing that all motocrossers value is adjustability that makes a difference, which is why the 2015 CRF450R is bound to be a big hit. The ability to quickly and easily change a bike to suit track conditions or riding style is a key to dropping lap times, and thanks to a motocross-first Engine Mode Select button and a latest-generation KYB PSF2 air fork, the new CRF makes it simpler than ever for owners to customize their ride experience. Meanwhile, a number of other calculated updates have further improved performance and Honda’s renowned reliability, ensuring that the bike’s status as the class benchmark is maintained. Time to adjust your concept of what’s possible.</p> <p><strong>Engineering Spotlight</strong></p> <p>WITH THE 2015 HONDA CRF450R, CHANGING POWER CURVES IS ACCOMPLISHED WITH THE PRESS OF A BUTTON</p> <p> Simultaneous with the advent of electronic fuel injected motocross bikes (2009, in the case of the Honda CRF450R) was the possibility for tuners to change the engine’s power curve. Until now, such adjustments necessitated connecting a computer via a special adapter, but with the 2015 CRF450R, actuating different power curves is as simple as pressing a handlebar-mounted, three-way Engine Mode Select button (EMS)—an industry first for motocross machines.</p> <p><strong>IN STOCK FORM, THE CRF COMES WITH THREE DIFFERENT EFI/IGNITION MAPS: STANDARD (MODE 1), SMOOTH (MODE 2) AND AGGRESSIVE (MODE 3).</strong></p> <p>The most common situation for selecting mode 2 would be when traction is limited and superior throttle control is most useful, while mode 3 could be chosen if soil is loamy and traction plentiful. To switch between modes, press the EMS button (located next to the throttle) and hold for about a second (throttle must be closed and the engine idling). The number of flashes emitted by the button’s blue LED corresponds to the selected mode, so getting a reminder is as simple as giving the button a quick push.</p> <p> For many riders, the three basic ECU map options will be plenty, but there are some who will want further customization. “You can change the fuel map and also the ignition-timing map," says HRA Senior Engineer Hide Hanawa. “If a customer buys an aftermarket exhaust, it’s easy to adjust for that." While the standard mode can’t be altered, modes 2 and 3 can be reworked via laptop computer and an available HRC® fuel-injection setting tool (customers who own last year’s tool only need update their software). And of course once the modes have been modified, actuating them is easy with the EMS button. Never before has experimenting with EFI mapping been so user-friendly.</p> <p><strong>Editorial Narratives & Assets</strong> <br> STORYLINES AND TOOLS</p> <p> SOMETHING IN THE AIR: IMPROVEMENTS TO KYB’S PNEUMATIC FORK, SIMPLIFIED ADJUSTMENT HEADLINE THE CRF450R’S SUSPENSION UPDATES</p> <p>Ever since outfitting the 2013 CRF450R with KYB’s Pneumatic Spring Fork (PSF), Honda has been at the forefront of the current air-suspension wave. For 2015, that trend continues, with the 450 coming standard with KYB’s latest-generation 48mm PSF2, which offers more suspension-adjustment options (including four-way independent damping adjustment) that are simple to engage. “The internal structure is completely different for 2015," explains KYB technician Kaz Chiba. “Now the fork has a self-lubricating, open-bath system, which makes damping action smoother. In addition, the fork is even lighter than on the 2014 bike."</p> <p> One of the main advantages of air-sprung suspension has always been reduced mass, thanks to the elimination of metal coil springs. That means less weight for the damping system to contend with whenever the stanchions change direction (frequent on rough motocross tracks!). With less unsprung weight, the front tire is on the ground more often, increasing rider control. Another important attribute of the PSF is increased (and easier) adjustability. “With an air spring, it’s possible to change spring rates without changing any parts," Chiba says. Of course, it has always been feasible to compensate for rider weight and track conditions by swapping out coil springs or adjusting preload, but in practice, some owners were dissuaded by the expense and complexity. With the CRF450R, changing the fork’s spring rate is as simple as altering the unit’s air pressure, and since a standard Schrader valve is used, the operation can be done with a basic air pump and pressure gauge—as straightforward (and affordable) as changing tire pressure.</p> <p>For 2015, that ease of adjustability has been extended beyond the spring rate to the damping. “Because the cylinder is larger, there’s more damping control," Chiba says. In addition, the newest PSF has clickers for no fewer than four damping adjustments: high- and low-speed for both compression and rebound. For simplicity’s sake, both compression adjustments are on the left side, while the rebound clickers are on the right, and all are conveniently located at the top of the fork legs.</p> <p> OTHER CHARACTERISTICS OF THE KYB PSF2 SYSTEM:</p> <ul> <li> Redesigned 32mm cartridge is in the conventional, upright position, resulting in half-pound weight savings over previous KYB PSF </li> <li>Self-lubricating system utilizes a check valve that distributes working fluid between the inner and outer sections during the compression stroke, keeping the bearing well-lubricated and reducing the </li> <li>Friction is reduced by approximately 10% and operability improved through a design that uses internal-charged pressure, eliminating the sealing material Meanwhile, the rear suspension has been upgraded as well, with the KYB shock now featuring both high- and low-speed compression damping for 2015 (in addition to the single rebound-damping adjustment). All adjustment clickers are located at the top of the shock body and are easily accessed via a cutout in the right side panel.</li> </ul> <p><strong>THE COMPLETE PACKAGE: UPDATES ABOUND ON HONDA’S CRF450R</strong></p> <p> While the big news for the 2015 Honda CRF450R is the EMS switch and updated suspension, Honda didn’t stop there. Several other updates improve the ride experience in ways that are easily overlooked:</p> <p> <strong>POWER PLANT</strong><br> The 449cc engine offers improved performance throughout its expanded power spectrum. There’s a new four-valve Unicam cylinder head and exhaust routing (the header pipe now exits to the right and no longer winds around the frame’s down tube), along with a larger internal diameter for the twin tail pipes. As a result, the engine delivers more top-end power and over-rev, while an increase in flywheel mass helps to maintain predictable low-end torque and make the engine less prone to stalling. Fuel-injection settings have been updated as well, while new radiators boost engine cooling. A new heat treatment of the piston increases strength and durability, and new Nickel Chrome Molybdenum transmission gears (10% stronger than the Steel Chrome Molybdenum parts they replace, with no weight penalty) add to Honda’s legendary reliability.</p> <p> <strong>PACKAGING</strong> <br> The exhaust system is now shorter and closer to the bike’s center of mass, resulting in improved handling</p> <p><strong>BRAKES</strong> <br> To slow the CRF450R, Honda added wave-style brake rotors front and rear. The front rotor is also 20 millimeters larger (260mm) for better stopping power and Honda’s signature linear feel.</p> <p> <strong>CONTROLS</strong> <br> Updated clutch-cable routing minimizes engine heat on the cable and decreases the force required to pull the lever, something that every rider will appreciate lap in, lap out. A new throttle-return spring also has a lighter pull.</p> <p> <strong>TIRES</strong> <br> Derived from AMA Supercross experience, Dunlop’s new-generation Geomax MX52 tires come stock on the CRF450R. The rear features patented blockon- block technology that offers improved traction, while the front also boasts better cornering feel.</p> <p> <strong>STYLING</strong> <br> Accompanying the CRF450R’s technical improvements are aesthetic updates, including a Renthal handlebar pad, new CRF graphics on the radiator shrouds and a number of blacked-out accents, including the rear-brake disc guard, rearcaliper guard and radiator grills.</p> <p> Often it’s the small things that can make or break a rider’s experience, and the new CRF450R is more than the sum of its parts. It offers better out-ofthe- crate performance and more trackside adjustment than ever before. Better power, shifting and braking culminate in an unrivaled ride experience.</p> <p><strong>Building Character PROFILE: HONDA R&D TEST RIDER TIMMY WEIGAND</strong></p> <p>During his 14-year career as a professional racer, Timmy Weigand has done it all, competing in various disciplines in both the U.S. and Australia. Apart from his two years Down Under, the Southern California native has ridden Hondas his entire career, whether as a privateer supercross/motocrosser, a member of the Moto XXX motocross team, or with the Johnny Campbell Racing off-road squad, which dominated Baja for years. “I’ve been with Honda forever," says Weigand, who often purchased his bikes through the manufacturer’s race-support program.</p> <p>“I NEVER REALLY TRIED TO GO FIND ANYTHING ELSE. HONDAS ARE GREAT FOR PRIVATEERS BECAUSE THEY LAST FOREVER!"</p> <p>That loyalty paid off after Weigand finally decided to retire from racing at the end of last season. “I made a list of companies that I had longtime relationships with and thought it might be nice to work for," Weigand says.</p> <p> Weigand was hired on a contractual basis as a test rider for Honda R&D, where he works with HRA Senior Engineer Hidenori Hanawa. In the case of the 2015 CRF motocrossers, that meant putting in long hours at motocross tracks across Southern California, helping to determine the final suspension and powercurve settings. For future CRF year models, he’ll be involved earlier in the development process as well.</p> <p>Weigand’s new position means he’s one of the first riders to try new Honda models, and he liked the CRF450R immediately. “The first thing I noticed was that the motor is stronger—you feel it right away," he says.</p> <p>“THE CHANGES TO THE POWER CURVE LET YOU GET TO THE TOP OF THE POWER RANGE QUICKER. THAT’S BETTER FOR AVERAGE RIDERS BECAUSE THEY’RE NOT ALWAYS ABLE TO MAINTAIN MOMENTUM IN THE CORNERS, SO THEY TEND TO ACCELERATE FROM THE BOTTOM QUITE OFTEN. I ALSO THINK HAVING THE DIFFERENT POWER MODES IS COOL BECAUSE THE BIKE OFFERS SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY. BEYOND THE ENGINE, I LIKE THAT THE SUSPENSION ADJUSTERS ARE MORE SENSITIVE, SO CUSTOMERS WILL DEFINITELY BE ABLE TO FEEL IT EVEN IF THEY JUST MOVE THEM A CLICK OR TWO. THE OVERSIZE FRONT DISC ADDS STOPPING POWER AND BETTER FEEL TO THE BRAKE."</p> <p>Weigand’s new stint as a Honda employee is off to a good start, with early signs indicating it could last even longer than his stretch as a Honda racer.</p> Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:11:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/releases/6f657c58-b17c-4f6f-a94d-0d9b7d83bc9f http://hondanews.com/releases/6f657c58-b17c-4f6f-a94d-0d9b7d83bc9f 2015 CRF450R Press Kit PDF <p> Whether you’re a pro like factory Honda racers Trey Canard and Cole Seely or an amateur vet rider at your local track, one thing that all motocrossers value is adjustability that makes a difference, which is why the 2015 CRF450R is bound to be a big hit. The ability to quickly and easily change a bike to suit track conditions or riding style is a key to dropping lap times, and thanks to a motocross-first Engine Mode Select button and a latest-generation KYB PSF2 air fork, the new CRF makes it simpler than ever for owners to customize their ride experience. Meanwhile, a number of other calculated updates have further improved performance and Honda’s renowned reliability, ensuring that the bike’s status as the class benchmark is maintained. Time to adjust your concept of what’s possible.</p> <p><strong>Engineering Spotlight</strong></p> <p>WITH THE 2015 HONDA CRF450R, CHANGING POWER CURVES IS ACCOMPLISHED WITH THE PRESS OF A BUTTON</p> <p> Simultaneous with the advent of electronic fuel injected motocross bikes (2009, in the case of the Honda CRF450R) was the possibility for tuners to change the engine’s power curve. Until now, such adjustments necessitated connecting a computer via a special adapter, but with the 2015 CRF450R, actuating different power curves is as simple as pressing a handlebar-mounted, three-way Engine Mode Select button (EMS)—an industry first for motocross machines.</p> <p><strong>IN STOCK FORM, THE CRF COMES WITH THREE DIFFERENT EFI/IGNITION MAPS: STANDARD (MODE 1), SMOOTH (MODE 2) AND AGGRESSIVE (MODE 3).</strong></p> <p>The most common situation for selecting mode 2 would be when traction is limited and superior throttle control is most useful, while mode 3 could be chosen if soil is loamy and traction plentiful. To switch between modes, press the EMS button (located next to the throttle) and hold for about a second (throttle must be closed and the engine idling). The number of flashes emitted by the button’s blue LED corresponds to the selected mode, so getting a reminder is as simple as giving the button a quick push.</p> <p> For many riders, the three basic ECU map options will be plenty, but there are some who will want further customization. “You can change the fuel map and also the ignition-timing map," says HRA Senior Engineer Hide Hanawa. “If a customer buys an aftermarket exhaust, it’s easy to adjust for that." While the standard mode can’t be altered, modes 2 and 3 can be reworked via laptop computer and an available HRC® fuel-injection setting tool (customers who own last year’s tool only need update their software). And of course once the modes have been modified, actuating them is easy with the EMS button. Never before has experimenting with EFI mapping been so user-friendly.</p> <p><strong>Editorial Narratives & Assets</strong> <br> STORYLINES AND TOOLS</p> <p> SOMETHING IN THE AIR: IMPROVEMENTS TO KYB’S PNEUMATIC FORK, SIMPLIFIED ADJUSTMENT HEADLINE THE CRF450R’S SUSPENSION UPDATES</p> <p>Ever since outfitting the 2013 CRF450R with KYB’s Pneumatic Spring Fork (PSF), Honda has been at the forefront of the current air-suspension wave. For 2015, that trend continues, with the 450 coming standard with KYB’s latest-generation 48mm PSF2, which offers more suspension-adjustment options (including four-way independent damping adjustment) that are simple to engage. “The internal structure is completely different for 2015," explains KYB technician Kaz Chiba. “Now the fork has a self-lubricating, open-bath system, which makes damping action smoother. In addition, the fork is even lighter than on the 2014 bike."</p> <p> One of the main advantages of air-sprung suspension has always been reduced mass, thanks to the elimination of metal coil springs. That means less weight for the damping system to contend with whenever the stanchions change direction (frequent on rough motocross tracks!). With less unsprung weight, the front tire is on the ground more often, increasing rider control. Another important attribute of the PSF is increased (and easier) adjustability. “With an air spring, it’s possible to change spring rates without changing any parts," Chiba says. Of course, it has always been feasible to compensate for rider weight and track conditions by swapping out coil springs or adjusting preload, but in practice, some owners were dissuaded by the expense and complexity. With the CRF450R, changing the fork’s spring rate is as simple as altering the unit’s air pressure, and since a standard Schrader valve is used, the operation can be done with a basic air pump and pressure gauge—as straightforward (and affordable) as changing tire pressure.</p> <p>For 2015, that ease of adjustability has been extended beyond the spring rate to the damping. “Because the cylinder is larger, there’s more damping control," Chiba says. In addition, the newest PSF has clickers for no fewer than four damping adjustments: high- and low-speed for both compression and rebound. For simplicity’s sake, both compression adjustments are on the left side, while the rebound clickers are on the right, and all are conveniently located at the top of the fork legs.</p> <p> OTHER CHARACTERISTICS OF THE KYB PSF2 SYSTEM:</p> <ul> <li> Redesigned 32mm cartridge is in the conventional, upright position, resulting in half-pound weight savings over previous KYB PSF </li> <li>Self-lubricating system utilizes a check valve that distributes working fluid between the inner and outer sections during the compression stroke, keeping the bearing well-lubricated and reducing the </li> <li>Friction is reduced by approximately 10% and operability improved through a design that uses internal-charged pressure, eliminating the sealing material Meanwhile, the rear suspension has been upgraded as well, with the KYB shock now featuring both high- and low-speed compression damping for 2015 (in addition to the single rebound-damping adjustment). All adjustment clickers are located at the top of the shock body and are easily accessed via a cutout in the right side panel.</li> </ul> <p><strong>THE COMPLETE PACKAGE: UPDATES ABOUND ON HONDA’S CRF450R</strong></p> <p> While the big news for the 2015 Honda CRF450R is the EMS switch and updated suspension, Honda didn’t stop there. Several other updates improve the ride experience in ways that are easily overlooked:</p> <p> <strong>POWER PLANT</strong><br> The 449cc engine offers improved performance throughout its expanded power spectrum. There’s a new four-valve Unicam cylinder head and exhaust routing (the header pipe now exits to the right and no longer winds around the frame’s down tube), along with a larger internal diameter for the twin tail pipes. As a result, the engine delivers more top-end power and over-rev, while an increase in flywheel mass helps to maintain predictable low-end torque and make the engine less prone to stalling. Fuel-injection settings have been updated as well, while new radiators boost engine cooling. A new heat treatment of the piston increases strength and durability, and new Nickel Chrome Molybdenum transmission gears (10% stronger than the Steel Chrome Molybdenum parts they replace, with no weight penalty) add to Honda’s legendary reliability.</p> <p> <strong>PACKAGING</strong> <br> The exhaust system is now shorter and closer to the bike’s center of mass, resulting in improved handling</p> <p><strong>BRAKES</strong> <br> To slow the CRF450R, Honda added wave-style brake rotors front and rear. The front rotor is also 20 millimeters larger (260mm) for better stopping power and Honda’s signature linear feel.</p> <p> <strong>CONTROLS</strong> <br> Updated clutch-cable routing minimizes engine heat on the cable and decreases the force required to pull the lever, something that every rider will appreciate lap in, lap out. A new throttle-return spring also has a lighter pull.</p> <p> <strong>TIRES</strong> <br> Derived from AMA Supercross experience, Dunlop’s new-generation Geomax MX52 tires come stock on the CRF450R. The rear features patented blockon- block technology that offers improved traction, while the front also boasts better cornering feel.</p> <p> <strong>STYLING</strong> <br> Accompanying the CRF450R’s technical improvements are aesthetic updates, including a Renthal handlebar pad, new CRF graphics on the radiator shrouds and a number of blacked-out accents, including the rear-brake disc guard, rearcaliper guard and radiator grills.</p> <p> Often it’s the small things that can make or break a rider’s experience, and the new CRF450R is more than the sum of its parts. It offers better out-ofthe- crate performance and more trackside adjustment than ever before. Better power, shifting and braking culminate in an unrivaled ride experience.</p> <p><strong>Building Character PROFILE: HONDA R&D TEST RIDER TIMMY WEIGAND</strong></p> <p>During his 14-year career as a professional racer, Timmy Weigand has done it all, competing in various disciplines in both the U.S. and Australia. Apart from his two years Down Under, the Southern California native has ridden Hondas his entire career, whether as a privateer supercross/motocrosser, a member of the Moto XXX motocross team, or with the Johnny Campbell Racing off-road squad, which dominated Baja for years. “I’ve been with Honda forever," says Weigand, who often purchased his bikes through the manufacturer’s race-support program.</p> <p>“I NEVER REALLY TRIED TO GO FIND ANYTHING ELSE. HONDAS ARE GREAT FOR PRIVATEERS BECAUSE THEY LAST FOREVER!"</p> <p>That loyalty paid off after Weigand finally decided to retire from racing at the end of last season. “I made a list of companies that I had longtime relationships with and thought it might be nice to work for," Weigand says.</p> <p> Weigand was hired on a contractual basis as a test rider for Honda R&D, where he works with HRA Senior Engineer Hidenori Hanawa. In the case of the 2015 CRF motocrossers, that meant putting in long hours at motocross tracks across Southern California, helping to determine the final suspension and powercurve settings. For future CRF year models, he’ll be involved earlier in the development process as well.</p> <p>Weigand’s new position means he’s one of the first riders to try new Honda models, and he liked the CRF450R immediately. “The first thing I noticed was that the motor is stronger—you feel it right away," he says.</p> <p>“THE CHANGES TO THE POWER CURVE LET YOU GET TO THE TOP OF THE POWER RANGE QUICKER. THAT’S BETTER FOR AVERAGE RIDERS BECAUSE THEY’RE NOT ALWAYS ABLE TO MAINTAIN MOMENTUM IN THE CORNERS, SO THEY TEND TO ACCELERATE FROM THE BOTTOM QUITE OFTEN. I ALSO THINK HAVING THE DIFFERENT POWER MODES IS COOL BECAUSE THE BIKE OFFERS SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY. BEYOND THE ENGINE, I LIKE THAT THE SUSPENSION ADJUSTERS ARE MORE SENSITIVE, SO CUSTOMERS WILL DEFINITELY BE ABLE TO FEEL IT EVEN IF THEY JUST MOVE THEM A CLICK OR TWO. THE OVERSIZE FRONT DISC ADDS STOPPING POWER AND BETTER FEEL TO THE BRAKE."</p> <p>Weigand’s new stint as a Honda employee is off to a good start, with early signs indicating it could last even longer than his stretch as a Honda racer.</p> Motorcycles: 2015 CRF450R Press Kit <p align="center"><strong>2015 CRF450R</strong><br> <strong>Competition Series</strong></p> <p>********************************************************************************************<br> <strong>Contents</strong></p> <ul> <li>2015 CRF450R: Adjust your concept of what's possible</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Engineering Spotlight: Changing power curves is accomplished with the press of a button</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Story Concepts: Editorial narratives: assets and tools</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Building Character: Honda R&D Test Rider Timmy Weigand</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Image Gallery: Studio and action photography assets for the 2015 CRF450R</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>*******************************************************************************************</p> <p><strong>2015 Honda CRF450R</strong><br> <strong>Adjust your concept of what's possible</strong></p> <p>Whether you're a pro like factory Honda racers Trey Canard and Cole Seely or an amateur vet rider at your local track, one thing that all motocrossers value is adjustability that makes a difference, which is why the 2015 CRF450R is bound to be a big hit. The ability to quickly and easily change a bike to suit track conditions or riding style is a key to dropping lap times, and thanks to a motocross-first Engine Mode Select button and a latest-generation KYB PSF2 air fork, the new CRF makes it simpler than ever for owners to customize their ride experience. Meanwhile, a number of other calculated updates have further improved performance and Honda's renowned reliability, ensuring that the bike's status as the class benchmark is maintained. Time to adjust your concept of what's possible.</p> <p> </p> <p>********************************************************************************************</p> <p align="center"><strong>Engineering Spotlight</strong></p> <p><strong>WITH THE 2015 HONDA CRF450R, CHANGING POWER CURVES IS ACCOMPLISHED WITH THE PRESS OF A BUTTON</strong><br> Simultaneous with the advent of electronic fuel injected motocross bikes (2009, in the case of the Honda CRF450R) was the possibility for tuners to change the engine's power curve. Until now, such adjustments necessitated connecting a computer via a special adapter, but with the 2015 CRF450R, actuating different power curves is as simple as pressing a handlebar-mounted, three-way Engine Mode Select button (EMS)—an industry first for motocross machines.<br>             In stock form, the CRF comes with three different EFI/ignition maps—standard (mode 1), smooth (mode 2) and aggressive (mode 3). The most common situation for selecting mode 2 would be when traction is limited and superior throttle control is most useful, while mode 3 could be chosen if soil is loamy and traction plentiful. To switch between modes, press the EMS button (located next to the throttle) and hold for about a second (throttle must be closed and the engine idling). The number of flashes emitted by the button's blue LED corresponds to the selected mode, so getting a reminder is as simple as giving the button a quick push.<br>             For many riders, the three basic ECU map options will be plenty, but there are some who will want further customization. "You can change the fuel map and also the ignition-timing map," says with HRA Senior Engineer Hidenori Hanawa. "If a customer buys an aftermarket exhaust, it's easy to adjust for that." While the standard mode can't be altered, modes 2 and 3 can be reworked via laptop computer and an available HRC® fuel-injection setting tool (customers who own last year's tool only need update their software). And of course once the modes have been modified, actuating them is easy with the EMS button. Never before has experimenting with EFI mapping been so user-friendly.</p> <p> </p> <p>********************************************************************************************<br> <strong>Editorial Narratives & Assets</strong><br> <strong>Storylines and tools</strong></p> <p><strong>SOMETHING IN THE AIR: IMPROVEMENTS TO KYB'S PNEUMATIC FORK, SIMPLIFIED ADJUSTMENT HEADLINE THE CRF450R'S SUSPENSION UPDATES</strong><br> Ever since outfitting the 2013 CRF450R with KYB's Pneumatic Spring Fork (PSF), Honda has been at the forefront of the current air-suspension wave. For 2015, that trend continues, with the 450 coming standard with KYB's latest-generation 48mm PSF2, which offers more suspension-adjustment options (including four-way independent damping adjustment) that are simple to engage. "The internal structure is completely different for 2015," explains KYB technician Kaz Chiba. "Now the fork has a self-lubricating, open-bath system, which makes damping action smoother. In addition, the fork is even lighter than on the 2014 bike."<br>             One of the main advantages of air-sprung suspension has always been reduced mass, thanks to the elimination of metal coil springs. That means less weight for the damping system to contend with whenever the stanchions change direction (frequent on rough motocross tracks!). With less unsprung weight, the front tire is on the ground more often, increasing rider control.<br>             Another important attribute of the PSF is increased (and easier) adjustability. "With an air spring, it's possible to change spring rates without changing any parts," Chiba says. Of course, it has always been feasible to compensate for rider weight and track conditions by swapping out coil springs or adjusting preload, but in practice, some owners were dissuaded by the expense and complexity. With the CRF450R, changing the fork's spring rate is as simple as altering the unit's air pressure, and since a standard Schrader valve is used, the operation can be done with a basic air pump and pressure gauge—as straightforward (and affordable) as changing tire pressure.<br>             For 2015, that ease of adjustability has been extended beyond the spring rate to the damping. "Because the cylinder is larger, there's more damping control," Chiba says. In addition, the newest PSF has clickers for no fewer than four damping adjustments: high- and low-speed for both compression and rebound. For simplicity's sake, both compression adjustments are on the left side, while the rebound clickers are on the right, and all are conveniently located at the top of the fork legs.<br>             Other characteristics of the KYB PSF2 system:</p> <ul> <li>Redesigned 32mm cartridge is in the conventional, upright position, resulting in half-pound weight savings over previous KYB PSF</li> <li>Self-lubricating system utilizes a check valve that distributes working fluid between the inner and outer sections during the compression stroke, keeping the bearing well-lubricated and reducing the risk of air leakage</li> <li>Friction is reduced by approximately 10% and operability improved through a design that uses internal-charged pressure, eliminating the sealing material</li> </ul> <p>Meanwhile, the rear suspension has been upgraded as well, with the KYB shock now featuring both high- and low-speed compression damping for 2015 (in addition to the single rebound-damping adjustment). All adjustment clickers are located at the top of the shock body and are easily accessed via a cutout in the right side panel.</p> <p>*****************</p> <p><strong>THE COMPLETE PACKAGE: UPDATES ABOUND ON HONDA'S CRF450R</strong><br> While the big news for the 2015 Honda CRF450R is the EMS switch and updated suspension, Honda didn't stop there. Several other updates improve the ride experience in ways that are easily overlooked:</p> <ul> <li><strong>POWER PLANT:</strong> The 449cc engine offers improved performance throughout its expanded power spectrum. There's a new four-valve Unicam cylinder head and exhaust routing (the header pipe now exits to the right and no longer winds around the frame's down tube), along with a larger internal diameter for the twin tail pipes. As a result, the engine delivers more top-end power and over-rev, while an increase in flywheel mass helps to maintain predictable low-end torque and make the engine less prone to stalling. Fuel-injection settings have been updated as well, while new radiators boost engine cooling. A new heat treatment of the piston increases strength and durability, and new Nickel Chrome Molybdenum transmission gears (10% stronger than the Steel Chrome Molybdenum parts they replace, with no weight penalty) add to Honda's legendary reliability.</li> <li><strong>PACKAGING:</strong> The exhaust system is now shorter and closer to the bike's center of mass, resulting in improved handling.</li> <li><strong>BRAKES:</strong> To slow the CRF450R, Honda added wave-style brake rotors front and rear. The front rotor is also 20 millimeters larger (260mm) for better stopping power and Honda's signature linear feel.</li> <li><strong>CONTROLS:</strong> Updated clutch-cable routing minimizes engine heat on the cable and decreases the force required to pull the lever, something that every rider will appreciate lap in, lap out. A new throttle-return spring also has a lighter pull.</li> <li><strong>TIRES:</strong> Derived from AMA Supercross experience, Dunlop's new-generation Geomax MX52 tires come stock on the CRF450R. The rear features patented block-on-block technology that offers improved traction, while the front also boasts better cornering feel.</li> <li><strong>STYLING:</strong> Accompanying the CRF450R's technical improvements are aesthetic updates, including a Renthal handlebar pad, new CRF graphics on the radiator shrouds and a number of blacked-out accents, including the rear-brake disc guard, rear-caliper guard and radiator grills.</li> </ul> <p>Often it's the small things that can make or break a rider's experience, and the new CRF450R is more than the sum of its parts. It offers better out-of-the-crate performance and more trackside adjustment than ever before. Better power, shifting and braking culminate in an unrivaled ride experience. </p> <p> </p> <p>********************************************************************************************</p> <p align="center"><strong>Building Character</strong><br> <strong>Profile: Honda R&D Test Rider Timmy Weigand</strong></p> <p>During his 14-year career as a professional racer, Timmy Weigand has done it all, competing in various disciplines in both the U.S. and Australia. Apart from his two years Down Under, the Southern California native has ridden Hondas his entire career, whether as a privateer supercross/motocrosser, a member of the Moto XXX motocross team, or with the Johnny Campbell Racing off-road squad, which dominated Baja for years. "I've been with Honda forever," says Weigand, who often purchased his bikes through the manufacturer's race-support program. "I never really tried to go find anything else. Hondas are great for privateers because they last forever!"<br>             That loyalty paid off after Weigand finally decided to retire from racing at the end of last season. "I made a list of companies that I had longtime relationships with and thought it might be nice to work for," Weigand says. "Honda was at the top of the list, so I sent in my résumé and it worked out."<br>             Weigand was hired on a contractual basis as a test rider for Honda R&D, where he works with HRA Senior Engineer Hidenori Hanawa. In the case of the 2015 CRF motocrossers, that meant putting in long hours at motocross tracks across Southern California, helping to determine the final suspension and power-curve settings. For future CRF year models, he'll be involved earlier in the development process as well.<br>             Weigand's new position means he's one of the first riders to try new Honda models, and he liked the CRF450R immediately. "The first thing I noticed was that the motor is stronger—you feel it right away," he says. "The changes to the power curve let you get to the top of the power range quicker. That's better for average riders because they're not always able to maintain momentum in the corners, so they tend to accelerate from the bottom quite often. I also think having the different power modes is cool because the bike offers something for everybody. Beyond the engine, I like that the suspension adjusters are more sensitive, so customers will definitely be able to feel it even if they just move them a click or two. The oversize front disc adds stopping power and better feel to the brake."<br>             Weigand's new stint as a Honda employee is off to a good start, with early signs indicating it could last even longer than his stretch as a Honda racer.</p> <p> </p> Motorcycles Fri, 12 Sep 2014 15:57:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/releases/acee043f-2d65-4549-af79-0825eef471ae http://hondanews.com/releases/acee043f-2d65-4549-af79-0825eef471ae 2015 CRF450R Press Kit <p align="center"><strong>2015 CRF450R</strong><br> <strong>Competition Series</strong></p> <p>********************************************************************************************<br> <strong>Contents</strong></p> <ul> <li>2015 CRF450R: Adjust your concept of what's possible</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Engineering Spotlight: Changing power curves is accomplished with the press of a button</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Story Concepts: Editorial narratives: assets and tools</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Building Character: Honda R&D Test Rider Timmy Weigand</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Image Gallery: Studio and action photography assets for the 2015 CRF450R</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>*******************************************************************************************</p> <p><strong>2015 Honda CRF450R</strong><br> <strong>Adjust your concept of what's possible</strong></p> <p>Whether you're a pro like factory Honda racers Trey Canard and Cole Seely or an amateur vet rider at your local track, one thing that all motocrossers value is adjustability that makes a difference, which is why the 2015 CRF450R is bound to be a big hit. The ability to quickly and easily change a bike to suit track conditions or riding style is a key to dropping lap times, and thanks to a motocross-first Engine Mode Select button and a latest-generation KYB PSF2 air fork, the new CRF makes it simpler than ever for owners to customize their ride experience. Meanwhile, a number of other calculated updates have further improved performance and Honda's renowned reliability, ensuring that the bike's status as the class benchmark is maintained. Time to adjust your concept of what's possible.</p> <p> </p> <p>********************************************************************************************</p> <p align="center"><strong>Engineering Spotlight</strong></p> <p><strong>WITH THE 2015 HONDA CRF450R, CHANGING POWER CURVES IS ACCOMPLISHED WITH THE PRESS OF A BUTTON</strong><br> Simultaneous with the advent of electronic fuel injected motocross bikes (2009, in the case of the Honda CRF450R) was the possibility for tuners to change the engine's power curve. Until now, such adjustments necessitated connecting a computer via a special adapter, but with the 2015 CRF450R, actuating different power curves is as simple as pressing a handlebar-mounted, three-way Engine Mode Select button (EMS)—an industry first for motocross machines.<br>             In stock form, the CRF comes with three different EFI/ignition maps—standard (mode 1), smooth (mode 2) and aggressive (mode 3). The most common situation for selecting mode 2 would be when traction is limited and superior throttle control is most useful, while mode 3 could be chosen if soil is loamy and traction plentiful. To switch between modes, press the EMS button (located next to the throttle) and hold for about a second (throttle must be closed and the engine idling). The number of flashes emitted by the button's blue LED corresponds to the selected mode, so getting a reminder is as simple as giving the button a quick push.<br>             For many riders, the three basic ECU map options will be plenty, but there are some who will want further customization. "You can change the fuel map and also the ignition-timing map," says with HRA Senior Engineer Hidenori Hanawa. "If a customer buys an aftermarket exhaust, it's easy to adjust for that." While the standard mode can't be altered, modes 2 and 3 can be reworked via laptop computer and an available HRC® fuel-injection setting tool (customers who own last year's tool only need update their software). And of course once the modes have been modified, actuating them is easy with the EMS button. Never before has experimenting with EFI mapping been so user-friendly.</p> <p> </p> <p>********************************************************************************************<br> <strong>Editorial Narratives & Assets</strong><br> <strong>Storylines and tools</strong></p> <p><strong>SOMETHING IN THE AIR: IMPROVEMENTS TO KYB'S PNEUMATIC FORK, SIMPLIFIED ADJUSTMENT HEADLINE THE CRF450R'S SUSPENSION UPDATES</strong><br> Ever since outfitting the 2013 CRF450R with KYB's Pneumatic Spring Fork (PSF), Honda has been at the forefront of the current air-suspension wave. For 2015, that trend continues, with the 450 coming standard with KYB's latest-generation 48mm PSF2, which offers more suspension-adjustment options (including four-way independent damping adjustment) that are simple to engage. "The internal structure is completely different for 2015," explains KYB technician Kaz Chiba. "Now the fork has a self-lubricating, open-bath system, which makes damping action smoother. In addition, the fork is even lighter than on the 2014 bike."<br>             One of the main advantages of air-sprung suspension has always been reduced mass, thanks to the elimination of metal coil springs. That means less weight for the damping system to contend with whenever the stanchions change direction (frequent on rough motocross tracks!). With less unsprung weight, the front tire is on the ground more often, increasing rider control.<br>             Another important attribute of the PSF is increased (and easier) adjustability. "With an air spring, it's possible to change spring rates without changing any parts," Chiba says. Of course, it has always been feasible to compensate for rider weight and track conditions by swapping out coil springs or adjusting preload, but in practice, some owners were dissuaded by the expense and complexity. With the CRF450R, changing the fork's spring rate is as simple as altering the unit's air pressure, and since a standard Schrader valve is used, the operation can be done with a basic air pump and pressure gauge—as straightforward (and affordable) as changing tire pressure.<br>             For 2015, that ease of adjustability has been extended beyond the spring rate to the damping. "Because the cylinder is larger, there's more damping control," Chiba says. In addition, the newest PSF has clickers for no fewer than four damping adjustments: high- and low-speed for both compression and rebound. For simplicity's sake, both compression adjustments are on the left side, while the rebound clickers are on the right, and all are conveniently located at the top of the fork legs.<br>             Other characteristics of the KYB PSF2 system:</p> <ul> <li>Redesigned 32mm cartridge is in the conventional, upright position, resulting in half-pound weight savings over previous KYB PSF</li> <li>Self-lubricating system utilizes a check valve that distributes working fluid between the inner and outer sections during the compression stroke, keeping the bearing well-lubricated and reducing the risk of air leakage</li> <li>Friction is reduced by approximately 10% and operability improved through a design that uses internal-charged pressure, eliminating the sealing material</li> </ul> <p>Meanwhile, the rear suspension has been upgraded as well, with the KYB shock now featuring both high- and low-speed compression damping for 2015 (in addition to the single rebound-damping adjustment). All adjustment clickers are located at the top of the shock body and are easily accessed via a cutout in the right side panel.</p> <p>*****************</p> <p><strong>THE COMPLETE PACKAGE: UPDATES ABOUND ON HONDA'S CRF450R</strong><br> While the big news for the 2015 Honda CRF450R is the EMS switch and updated suspension, Honda didn't stop there. Several other updates improve the ride experience in ways that are easily overlooked:</p> <ul> <li><strong>POWER PLANT:</strong> The 449cc engine offers improved performance throughout its expanded power spectrum. There's a new four-valve Unicam cylinder head and exhaust routing (the header pipe now exits to the right and no longer winds around the frame's down tube), along with a larger internal diameter for the twin tail pipes. As a result, the engine delivers more top-end power and over-rev, while an increase in flywheel mass helps to maintain predictable low-end torque and make the engine less prone to stalling. Fuel-injection settings have been updated as well, while new radiators boost engine cooling. A new heat treatment of the piston increases strength and durability, and new Nickel Chrome Molybdenum transmission gears (10% stronger than the Steel Chrome Molybdenum parts they replace, with no weight penalty) add to Honda's legendary reliability.</li> <li><strong>PACKAGING:</strong> The exhaust system is now shorter and closer to the bike's center of mass, resulting in improved handling.</li> <li><strong>BRAKES:</strong> To slow the CRF450R, Honda added wave-style brake rotors front and rear. The front rotor is also 20 millimeters larger (260mm) for better stopping power and Honda's signature linear feel.</li> <li><strong>CONTROLS:</strong> Updated clutch-cable routing minimizes engine heat on the cable and decreases the force required to pull the lever, something that every rider will appreciate lap in, lap out. A new throttle-return spring also has a lighter pull.</li> <li><strong>TIRES:</strong> Derived from AMA Supercross experience, Dunlop's new-generation Geomax MX52 tires come stock on the CRF450R. The rear features patented block-on-block technology that offers improved traction, while the front also boasts better cornering feel.</li> <li><strong>STYLING:</strong> Accompanying the CRF450R's technical improvements are aesthetic updates, including a Renthal handlebar pad, new CRF graphics on the radiator shrouds and a number of blacked-out accents, including the rear-brake disc guard, rear-caliper guard and radiator grills.</li> </ul> <p>Often it's the small things that can make or break a rider's experience, and the new CRF450R is more than the sum of its parts. It offers better out-of-the-crate performance and more trackside adjustment than ever before. Better power, shifting and braking culminate in an unrivaled ride experience. </p> <p> </p> <p>********************************************************************************************</p> <p align="center"><strong>Building Character</strong><br> <strong>Profile: Honda R&D Test Rider Timmy Weigand</strong></p> <p>During his 14-year career as a professional racer, Timmy Weigand has done it all, competing in various disciplines in both the U.S. and Australia. Apart from his two years Down Under, the Southern California native has ridden Hondas his entire career, whether as a privateer supercross/motocrosser, a member of the Moto XXX motocross team, or with the Johnny Campbell Racing off-road squad, which dominated Baja for years. "I've been with Honda forever," says Weigand, who often purchased his bikes through the manufacturer's race-support program. "I never really tried to go find anything else. Hondas are great for privateers because they last forever!"<br>             That loyalty paid off after Weigand finally decided to retire from racing at the end of last season. "I made a list of companies that I had longtime relationships with and thought it might be nice to work for," Weigand says. "Honda was at the top of the list, so I sent in my résumé and it worked out."<br>             Weigand was hired on a contractual basis as a test rider for Honda R&D, where he works with HRA Senior Engineer Hidenori Hanawa. In the case of the 2015 CRF motocrossers, that meant putting in long hours at motocross tracks across Southern California, helping to determine the final suspension and power-curve settings. For future CRF year models, he'll be involved earlier in the development process as well.<br>             Weigand's new position means he's one of the first riders to try new Honda models, and he liked the CRF450R immediately. "The first thing I noticed was that the motor is stronger—you feel it right away," he says. "The changes to the power curve let you get to the top of the power range quicker. That's better for average riders because they're not always able to maintain momentum in the corners, so they tend to accelerate from the bottom quite often. I also think having the different power modes is cool because the bike offers something for everybody. Beyond the engine, I like that the suspension adjusters are more sensitive, so customers will definitely be able to feel it even if they just move them a click or two. The oversize front disc adds stopping power and better feel to the brake."<br>             Weigand's new stint as a Honda employee is off to a good start, with early signs indicating it could last even longer than his stretch as a Honda racer.</p> <p> </p> Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF150F <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/ce60/4d50/ce604d50-4330-4952-aeac-0e477576b72c-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF150F Motorcycles Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:53:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf150f http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf150f 2015 Honda CRF150F <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/ce60/4d50/ce604d50-4330-4952-aeac-0e477576b72c-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF150F Motorcycles: 2015 Honda CRF230F <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/6da9/be46/6da9be46-a084-4803-afa8-ee59b42eee3f-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF230F Motorcycles Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:41:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf230f http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-crf230f 2015 Honda CRF230F <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/6da9/be46/6da9be46-a084-4803-afa8-ee59b42eee3f-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda CRF230F Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/e627/7ee6/e6277ee6-050e-4493-b4f3-82a18341553e-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-f6b http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-f6b 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/e627/7ee6/e6277ee6-050e-4493-b4f3-82a18341553e-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Shadow Aero <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/b3c1/5c6f/b3c15c6f-df36-4cc5-9e9c-c1d86b50eae8-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Shadow Aero Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-shadow-aero-1 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-shadow-aero-1 2015 Honda Shadow Aero <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/b3c1/5c6f/b3c15c6f-df36-4cc5-9e9c-c1d86b50eae8-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Shadow Aero Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Fury <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/9f80/d1e5/9f80d1e5-33a0-47c9-9d5a-4b02160c0cdd-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Fury Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-fury-2 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-fury-2 2015 Honda Fury <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/9f80/d1e5/9f80d1e5-33a0-47c9-9d5a-4b02160c0cdd-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Fury Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Fury <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/9446/c14d/9446c14d-6252-420f-9d84-9ef88f9da00a-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Fury Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-fury-1 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-fury-1 2015 Honda Fury <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/9446/c14d/9446c14d-6252-420f-9d84-9ef88f9da00a-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Fury Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/ce42/9a0a/ce429a0a-3014-486a-b59c-818d3aab20ee-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-goldwing-1 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-goldwing-1 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/ce42/9a0a/ce429a0a-3014-486a-b59c-818d3aab20ee-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles: 2015 Honda XR650L <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/9214/e9e5/9214e9e5-9d70-4898-a5a9-a315d7ce781c-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda XR650L Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-xr650l http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-xr650l 2015 Honda XR650L <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/9214/e9e5/9214e9e5-9d70-4898-a5a9-a315d7ce781c-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda XR650L Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/8a23/dd5d/8a23dd5d-bebf-4266-b7ea-d3e0a5396e9d-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-goldwing http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-goldwing 2015 Honda Gold Wing <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/8a23/dd5d/8a23dd5d-bebf-4266-b7ea-d3e0a5396e9d-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/5e28/4b30/5e284b30-6bd6-4611-b12b-f441dfaa8f87-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-f6b-2 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-f6b-2 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/5e28/4b30/5e284b30-6bd6-4611-b12b-f441dfaa8f87-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B Motorcycles: 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/ad4f/17ea/ad4f17ea-1310-4563-be3c-c396c6977e71-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B Motorcycles Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 -0700 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-f6b-3 http://hondanews.com/photos/2015-honda-gold-wing-f6b-3 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B <img src="http://cdn.hondanews.com/photos/ad4f/17ea/ad4f17ea-1310-4563-be3c-c396c6977e71-100x100-thumb.jpg" /> <br/> 2015 Honda Gold Wing/F6B